Maskboy

Lets give Covid a kick

New Book
New Book Sneeze

My Mask And I

bookcover

HAVING TROUBLE WEARING THAT MASK?
PERHAPS THIS BOOK WILL MAKE IT EASIER.

My Mask and I, A Covid Story, brings to life a boy and his mask who together fight the Covid germs, "Cough" and "Sneeze" in order to bring back the world they once knew. This happy, playful story has all the poetic flavors of Dr. Seuss yet deals with the serious topic of taking care of yourself and others through social distancing, washing hands and wearing masks. Kids and adults alike are in need of a smile and some encouragement in the midst of this pandemic to keep up the effort and fight the war on Covid.

Have you ever wondered how this book came about?
Here’s a little history…

In August of 2020, a friend sent me a science video about how long a sneeze can go. (I’ve got the clip below for you to see for yourselves.) I watched it and the farthest sneeze went 23-26 feet! I laughingly said, “I guess we now have to distance ourselves 23-26 feet instead of 6 feet!”
After that text, I began to ponder the sneeze and cough from the video that is related to having the Covid-19 illness. Inspired, I sat down and began to write a poem that had the same rhythmic style as Dr. Seuss. (No, I was not thinking of Dr. Seuss at the time of writing the poem!). It just flowed and flowed. I couldn’t stop writing until it felt complete.
The lyrical style of the poem was so playful that it made me smile and I wanted others to smile as well.
Also, the importance of us all coming together to fight this terrible virus prompted me to make it into a children’s book.

How Covid-19 Spreads

On March 26,2020, Dr. Lydia Bourouiba, PhD, from MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) produced research on what is in a sneeze and how far a sneeze can actually go. What she found was that a sneeze is made up of pathogen droplets within a puff of gas and can travel within a range of 20 inches up to 23 to 26 feet. According to Dr. Bourouiba, masks can be used both for source control (ie, reducing spread from an infected person) and for protection of the wearer (ie, preventing spread to an unaffected person).